1.28.2005

I Met Ann Brashares!

Last night I went to a bookstore in Bucks County to see Ann Brashares, author of the Sisterhood books. It was the first night of her tour for the third book in the series, called Girls in Pants. It was so great! She told the story about how she became a writer--the first book was written on a sabbatical from work at a publishing company while she was pregnant with her THIRD child! She answered audience questions about her characters, the upcoming movie, the fourth book (there will be one more), and her other writing projects.

I read the new book yesterday before I went, and it was very enjoyable. So the best part of going to meet her was that she signed books. I got one for me, one for the library, and one for a prize for next summer. So, look for the autographed copy of Girls in Pants, which should be on the shelf soon! I also gave her two pictures of our sisterhood event from December, showing her the jeans we wrote on and the purses we made. She was really interested in what we had done!

Proof!!! Posted by Hello

1.23.2005

Reed Moore Boocks

With all the snow, guess what I've been doing??!! That's right...reading through the giant stack o' YA novels by my bed...

Acceleration by Graham McNamee (NEW!)
This quote from the back of the cover says it all: "Me and you going after this guy," Vinny says, "it's like the Hardy Boys meet Hannibal Lechter."

how i live now by Meg Rosoff
In the not-so-distant future, enemy forces take over England while most of that country's solders are away fighting a war. This gripping book shares the survival experiences of a scattered group of cousins as they try to make their way home. I think that the most chilling part of this book is that this kind of hostile takeover could really happen in our world.

King of the Mild Frontier by Chris Crutcher
In this autobiography, Crutcher shares his memories of growing up as a "dateless, broken-toothed, scabbed-over, God-fearing dweeb." He wasn't good at much of anything back then (like athletics, boy scouts, or thinking), but he has turned all of his miserable experiences into great teen books!

Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve
In the distant future, many cities and towns are mobile and roam the great hunting ground that used to be Europe. They don't hunt animals...they hunt each other. Intrigue and betrayal fuel this dark story.

Vegan Virgin Valentine by Carolyn Mackler
Mara Valentine is a high-strung over-achieving control-freak high school senior...until her slutty, pot-smoking 16-year-old niece (yes, niece) comes to live with her family. Just imagine the chaos...

1.22.2005

DDR Night Rocks!

Last night's DDR event was a total success...we didn't even make any plaster fall off the ceiling in the children's room below! Thirteens teens attended the event, representing grades 6-12. Sean was the master of DDR, giving a demo and helping keep the event running smoothly. Also, props to Jason (my husband) for coming over and hooking up the XBox to the wall projector and the speakers. Everyone had a great time! Wesley won the dance contest, and Ashleigh came in second. They won gift certificates to Game Stop. We may do this again in the future because it was so great!

1.21.2005

Summer Reading Program

It's supposed to snow as much as 10 inches this weekend, and that is making me really look forward to this summer! I am thinking about all the events we can do with the theme Dragons, Dreams, and Daring Deeds (for kids) and Joust Read (for teens). Here are my ideas so far:
  • Jester Workshop (learn juggling, jokes, gags, and other foolish tricks)

  • Calligraphy or Illumination Workshop (Sarah will handle this!)

  • Live Chess (kids and teens act out a game played by two community members)

  • Swordfighting Demonstration and Workshop (invite members of the Society for Creative Anachronism to show their stuff and teach us some moves...with plastic swords...)
To add your ideas, comment on this post or tell me next time you're in the library!

1.17.2005

Printz Awards Announced!

Today was a big day for everyone who loves to read...the American Library Association named their yearly award winners. They give out many awards, but the most famous are the Caldecott (picture books), Newbery (children's fiction/nonfiction), and Coretta Scott King (both picture books and children's fiction/nonfiction).

One ALA award that is important to teens is one you may not have heard about. It is the Michael L. Printz award for excellence in young adult literature. This year's winner was how i live now by Meg Rosoff. I just read this book yesterday, and it is really haunting me. I highly recommend it. Honor awards went to Airborn by Kenneth Oppel, Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy by Gary D. Schmidt (I read this one, too), and Chanda's Secrets by Allan Stratton.

Another ALA award you might want to think about is the Margaret A. Edwards Award, given for an exceptional body of work in teen literature. This year, Francesca Lia Block is the "slinkster-cool" recipient of the award. Her books include Weetzie Bat, Witch Baby, Cherokee Bat and the Goat Guys, Missing Angel Juan, and Baby Be-Bop. If you have never heard of Francesca Lia Block, go read her books now. They are urban fairytales, and you will love her unique characters.

Read the complete award press release from the ALA HERE.

1.16.2005

Worthy Reads

It's cold outside! Stay in an read a book!!!

Alice, I Think and Miss Smithers by Susan Juby
Both of these books feature the quirky Alice, who has been homeschooled her whole life, until now. Between exploring thrift-store fashion, fearing for the adjustment of Death Lord Bob (her counselor), and dealing with aging hippies, Alice manages to enter the real world...on her own terms.

Dragon Rider by Cornelia Funke
When humans threaten one of the last dragon habitats, one brave dragon sets out to find the mythical Rim of Heaven where all dragons can live in peace. With a brownie, a boy, and the help of some rats, Firedrake begins his journey...

Hole in My Life by Jack Gantos
Jack Gantos is a well-known author of children's books including the Rotten Ralph series and the Joey Pigza books. This autobiography covers the years before he began his writing career...when he was jailed for sailing a boat of heroin from St. Croix to NYC!

Nothing to Lose by Alex Flinn
Michael Daye has spent the last year hiding out with a traveling carnival under an assumed name. He returns to his hometown, Miami, just in time for the start of his mother's trial for the murder of his wealthy abusive stepfather. Was it self-defense?

The True Meaning of Cleavage by Mariah Fredericks
This is the other meaning of the word...the one that means "breaking apart." Starting high school brings conflict between Jess and Sari. Jess prefers sci-fi and art, while Sari starts secretly hanging out with an ultra-popular senior (who already has a girlfriend). This can only lead to trouble...

1.14.2005

Teen Corner Displays

Right now, the teen section has a record three displays, so you can definitely find something to read!

1. In the window by the lobby door, look for new books. We have many of these, and the display is always changing.

2. In the other window, read about best friends on the jeans from Sisterhood night. Then, choose some "girl power" books from the display.

3. Along the top of the bookshelf, find the NEW "Big Brother Is Watching" booklist and display. These books are all creepy future fantasies in which freedom and liberty are unknown experiences.

Check out the Sisterhood display! Posted by Hello

1.13.2005

Book Group Notes

The teen book group met today to discuss Neal Shusterman's book Full Tilt. Everyone was intrigued by the book and had unique interpretations and insights about Blake's night at the carnival from...um...Hades. Visit Neal Shusterman's website http://www.storyman.com to learn more about his work.

Next month we will meet on February 10 to discuss The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer. Join now!

After reading Full Tilt, Caitlin drew the characters. (From R to L: Blake, Quinn, Maggie, Russ, and Cassandra) Posted by Hello

1.02.2005

Recommended Reading

Happy New Year! I finally had time to catch up on my YA reading, so here are some recommendations:

Bucking the Sarge by Christopher Paul Curtis (NEW!)
Luther T. Farrell has it made...a fake ID, his own ride, and plenty of cash. That is, until his science fair project challenges the slum empire of his mother, the Sarge.

Double Helix by Nancy Werlin (NEW!)
What does they mysterious Dr. Wyatt have to do with Eli's past? And how far will Eli go to find out?

Half-Human compiled and edited by Bruce Coville
What if you had wings that didn't work? What if you had always felt a subtle pull to the sea? What if only one of your parents was human!? This book of short stories features work by fantasy writers like Nancy Springer, Tamora Pierce, Jane Yolen, and, of course, Bruce Coville.

Jude by Kate Morgenroth
Jude's father was a dealer...until he was killed in front of Jude. Jude's mother (a local district attorney) takes him in and sends him to a fancy prep school. But when one of the kids there dies from a drug overdose, Jude is suspected. The action in this book never stops!

Stoner and Spaz by Ron Koertge
What happens when a social reject with cerebral palsy becomes friends with the school druggie? Not what you'd expect.